Winter wedges

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By JCrowder-Barton

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  • 13 Replies
  1. Does anyone else change sand wedges for one with less bounce for wet winter bunkers? Or any other major club swaps?

  2. Brian M

    Brian M
    Totnes, Devon

    Just switched from a 60 deg K grind with 14 degrees of bounce to a S grind with 10 degrees of bounce. It is certainly more reliable in hard packed sand although I can still hit it 25 yards over the green!

    Roll on summer!
  3. No... No changes for winter.
    I can just as easily scalp my existing sand wedge as one with less bounce. I generally avoid bunkers as I'm not to hot at getting out of them.
    JT
  4. Chris M

    Chris M
    Grindelwald,

    I would rather change to a wedge with more bounce!
    When the ground is very wet the higher bounce tends to digg in less!
  5. Chris M said:

    I would rather change to a wedge with more bounce!
    When the ground is very wet the higher bounce tends to digg in less!

    I find that more bounce can also cause you to hit one thin and straight over the green.
  6. Denis C

    Denis C
    Mallow,

    Agree with Chris M,
    More bounce is better in winter for overall course use. Understand the point about rain packed bunkers, but work on using that same bounce to really impact the sand and the ball will pop up and out every time.
    Don't take my word for it, winter is a great time to work on things like this with your local PGA pro
  7. I'm a retired Pro, does that make a difference? I worked in the game for twenty years before moving on to other things.
  8. I find that if I can get out of the dodgy winter sand then bunker play is great after a few months practice.
  9. AntD

    AntD
    Hampshire, UK

    I use my Vokeys less in the winter from the fairway opting for my AP1 gap and pitching wedge and I'll make a decision on the lie and shot required in bunkers either the 52 with less bounce or 56.

    Ant
  10. Steven C

    Steven C
    Haddington

    Have swapped out the 58.04 L Grind SM6 for a 58.08 M Grind. Need the low bounce for summer with hard ground and tight lies, but prefer a little more bounce for the softer winter conditions on my course.
  11. Trevor P

    Trevor P
    Brentwood, Essex

    I also change my SM7 54.08 for a 54.12 during the winter, when it is wet, as I find I take to much of a divot.
  12. Lefty

    Lefty
    Hertfordshire, UK

    I recently purchased a 58 / 10 wedge to replace a 58 / 12 as I felt the higher bounce was causing a variety of bladed shots around the green due to the leading edge sitting up.

    Played my 58 / 10 and it really digs in before the ball resulting in chunking the ball 3 yards.

    My plan is to practice with both as I haven't spent enough time to master them but I'm thinking the higher bounce is the better option for winter and the lower bounce better for summer conditions.
  13. Lefty said:

    I recently purchased a 58 / 10 wedge to replace a 58 / 12 as I felt the higher bounce was causing a variety of bladed shots around the green due to the leading edge sitting up.

    Played my 58 / 10 and it really digs in before the ball resulting in chunking the ball 3 yards.

    My plan is to practice with both as I haven't spent enough time to master them but I'm thinking the higher bounce is the better option for winter and the lower bounce better for summer conditions.

    My original question was with regard to playing from wet sand in bunkers, which is usually quite ‘hard’, and therefore I use less bounce.
    It seems that most people are replying to the use of wedges off grass.
    So in winter turf is damp and softer and maybe extra bounce would be better.
    With regard to blading the ball across the green, this is usually because the club head to getting in front of the hands. A ‘chunked’ shot is often the result of a steep angle of attack, maybe too much wrist hinge in the backswing.
    I find that out of sand or playing pitches and chips around the green, my wrists must generally be kept as inactive as possible. Of course they are exceptions.
    The main thing is the leading wrist (the left for right handed players) must not collapse.
    I often practice with an alignment stick stuck down through the top of the grip, you may need to enlarge the hole slightly.
    The left hand is then kept slightly in front of the club head at all times. If the wrist collapse the stick will try hit you on the left side of your body.
    Another thing I do is to open the face on short chips and pitches. This has the effect of widening the sole and thereby reducing the possibility of it digging in. I try to concentrate on feeling the back edge sliding under the ball.
    One further tip may be to pre-grind your leading edge, this also helps to prevent any digging in.
    On the other hand, my thoughts may be completely wrong and I have been fooling myself.
    I leave it for others to judge and make comment.
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  14. I lot of thins is more likely to be something to do with technic and not the amount of bounce on the wedges you have.

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